There Should Be Stricter Rules That Handle Students Of Misconduct

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) reported a staggering statistic last month: in one in four teachers in OECD countries, more than 30 percent of class time is lost due to order problems. A big problem, because there is ample investment in all kinds of educational innovations, but what good are these if so many lessons are lost in chaos? Schools need more room to maneuver in tackling unwanted behavior.

In England, the issue was responded to this month with a bill that should make it possible for schools to deal more effectively with misconduct. There, too, the level of misconduct has long gone beyond throwing paper airplanes: more and more teachers are confronted with aggression and physical violence.

The English bill mainly tries to curb the bureaucracy that schools have to deal with. Suspension letters no longer have to be sent within 24 hours, lecturers are given search rights, there is more protection against false allegations and efforts are being made to reduce the regulation of the use of physical violence. The ‘don’t touch’ rule is banned in the UK. Lecturers are given the right to intervene, if necessary.

Schools are therefore only going to put pupils home without reporting this to the Inspectorate. Keeping the student away from school is not an option when students are a threat to staff and fellow students, but acting according to the book is not. Officially they are still registered, but these students are no longer allowed to take classes. In some cases, these students are given take-home work which they can complete with the help of UK assignment help. This is, of course, a very bad situation for the student who hardly copes up in school.

However, there should be nothing to prevent schools from removing students from school because they bring a weapon into the building, attack a teacher, or grope girls immorally. But unfortunately, a jungle of rules gets in the way of this. This ensures that schools react to the margins of the law, or do not respond at all. As a result, these types of students, who clearly pose a threat to the primary process, can terrorize schools day in and day out.

Parents expect schools to act adequately so that their children can go to school safely. And rightly so: schools should strive for a safe living and learning climate. And schools could be supported in this by a less meddlesome government.